Research news and awards

Latest news about our research. Project progress and collaboration. Awards and achievements.


Sev Kender

Dr Sev Kender has been appointed as a Research Fellow within the Centre for Environmental Geochemistry (University of Nottingham) and an Honorary Research Fellow with the British Geological Survey. Sev is a Micropalaeontologist and Palaeoeanographer and has just returned from an IODP expedition off the coast of Japan, in the Philippine Sea, collecting sediment cores to investigate past changes in the ocean.



12 August 2014

NERC impact awards logo

To mark its 50th anniversary, NERC is pleased to announce its inaugural Impact Awards.

The awards will recognise and reward NERC-funded researchers, as individuals or teams, whose work has had substantial impact on the economy and society. The awards will culminate in a prize-giving ceremony in London on 27 January 2015, showcasing the researchers, their work and the impact of the science that NERC funds.

There will be four award categories:

  • Economic Impact Award
    Recognising research that has achieved exceptional economic benefit.
  • Societal Impact Award
    Recognising research that has achieved exceptional social, cultural, public policy or service, health, environmental or quality of life benefits.
  • International Impact Award
    Recognising research that has achieved exceptional economic and/or societal impact outside the UK.
  • Early Career Impact Award
    Recognising an early career researcher who has achieved exceptional economic and/or societal impact within the UK or internationally.

A winner from one of the four categories will be selected to receive the Overall Impact Award, in recognition of the outstanding impact of their research.

The winner of each category will receive £10,000 and the runner-up £5,000, to further the impacts of their research. The Overall Impact Award winner will receive an additional £30,000.

You can apply for an award yourself, or nominate someone else. The closing date for applications is 16:00 Wednesday 10 September 2014.

More information



8 August 2014

Geology Cover July 2014

Around ca. 56 million years ago there was a major global environmental perturbation attributed to a rapid rise in the concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. The period, called the Palaeocene-Eocene boundary, is often used as an analogue for a future greenhouse world. This paper shows for the first time that temperatures of tropical oceans rose to greater than 40°C and may have been the cause of loss of some marine biota at this time.



29 July 2014

Jonathan Dean Graduation

Congratulations to Dr Jonathan Dean who graduated from the University of Nottingham yesterday. Jonathan is currently working within the Stable Isotope Facility at the BGS as an Isotope Apprentice. His PhD research was entitled: Stable Isotope Analysis and U-Th Dating of Late Glacial and Holocene Lacustrine Sediments from Central Turkey.



21 July 2014

Dr Jonathan Dean

This paper considers whether the Anthropocene is recorded in the isotope geochemistry of the atmosphere, sediments, plants and ice cores, and the time frame during which any changes are recorded, presenting examples from the literature. Dean, J.R., Leng, M.J., Mackay, A.W. 2014. Is there an isotopic signature of the Anthropocene? The Anthropocene Review.



16 July 2014

Annemarie Valentine
Annemarie Valentine from the University of Derby has successfully defended her PhD research on "An investigation into the seasonality of the Pliocene southern North Sea Basin: a sclerochronological approach". Annemarie was supervised by Dr Andy Johnson at the University of Derby and Prof Melanie Leng at the BGS.


4 July 2014

Andi Smith
Andi Smith from the University of Lancaster has defended his PhD research on Speleothem Climate Capture – A Holocene Reconstruction of Northern Iberian Climate and Environmental Change". Andi was supervised by Dr Peter Wynn and Prof Phil Barker at Lancaster University and Prof Melanie Leng and Dr Steve Noble at the BGS.


4 July 2014

The Geological Society

The Geological Society has released a new Special Publication, 'A Stratigraphical Basis for the Anthropocene' that summarises the evidence that we’re now living in a new geological epoch – one of our own making.

The report has been edited by Colin Waters and Mike Ellis, with authors including Simon Price, Jon Ford, Ian Wilkinson and Tony Cooper.



16 June 2014

3D geological model
Presentations from the British Geological Survey's Stakeholder Forum which took place at The Royal Society on Monday 2 June. The short programme included presentations on the BGS Strategy and developments on our business entity, followed by a networking reception.


10 June 2014

Nature cover
A new research project has begun to examine the history of chickens, involving archaeological records to investigate the history of the world’s most widely established livestock species, originally descended from the wild jungle fowl of South East Asia. The project, entitled Cultural and Scientific Perceptions of Human-Chicken Interactions", was made possible with the help of a £1.94 million grant from the AHRC under the Science In Culture Awards Large Grants call. Researchers from Nottingham University, as well as universities of Bournemouth, Durham, Leicester, Roehampton and York, will be examining when and how rapidly domesticated chickens spread across Europe and the history of their exploitation for meat and eggs. Research methods will include stable isotope analysis at the BGS Stable Isotope Facility, in collaboration with the University of Nottingham within the Centre for Environmental Geochemistry. For more information see this issue of Nature.


9 June 2014